Skip navigation

Tag Archives: culture

Link: Been playing some Weiqi (Go) in my free time.

Go (Japanese:碁?), known in Chinese as weiqi (simplified Chinesetraditional Chinesepinyin: wéiqí; Wade-Giles: wei ch’i) and in Korean as baduk (hangul바둑), is an ancient board game for two players that is noted for being rich in strategy despite its simplerules.

The game is played by two players who alternately place black and white stones on the vacant intersections of a grid of 19×19 lines. Once placed on the board, stones cannot be moved elsewhere, unless they are surrounded and captured by the opponent’s stones. The object of the game is to control (surround) a larger portion of the board than the opponent.

Placing stones close together helps them support each other and avoid capture. On the other hand, placing stones far apart creates influence across more of the board. Part of the strategic difficulty of the game stems from finding a balance between such conflicting interests. Players strive to serve both defensive and offensive purposes and choose between tactical urgency and strategic plans.

Go originated in ancient China more than 2,500 years ago. Although it is not known exactly when the game was invented, by the 3rd century BC it was already a popular pastime, as indicated by a reference to the game in the Analects of Confucius. Archaeological evidence shows that the early game was played on a board with a 17×17 grid, but by the time that the game spread to Korea and Japan in about the 7th century, boards with a 19×19 grid had become standard.

The game is most popular in East Asia. A conservative estimate places the number of Go players worldwide at approximately 27 million.[2] Go reached the West through Japan, which is why it is commonly known internationally by its Japanese name.[nb 1]

Advertisements

Reddit #1

Link: Radiohead’s Colin Greenwood explains why the band released their last album direct to their fans

I’m unconvinced that the internet has replaced the club or the concert hall as a forum for people to share ideas and passions about music. Social networking models such as Twitter and foursquare are early efforts at this but have some way to go to emulate the ecosystem that labels such as Island drew upon, the interconnected club and studio worlds of managers, musicians, artists and record company mavericks, let alone pay for such a fertile environment. Shoreditch, in east London, has a vibrant scene right now, with independent labels such as WichitaBella Union and distribution companies like The Co-op, alongside the busy Strongroom studio. I spoke to a friend, Dan Grech-Marguerat, about the scene. He is a busy mixer and producer, and told me that he could just sit at home and work on the computer but would miss the social buzz and benefits of working at the Strongroom and other studios.

There are signs that the net is moving out of its adolescence, and preparing to leave its bedroom. I have noticed on the fan message sites that a lot of the content and conversations have grown up, moved away from staccato chat and trolling, to discussions about artists, taste and trends, closer to writing found in music magazines.

via MJWarshauer

http://video.ted.com/assets/player/swf/EmbedPlayer.swf

Seth Priebatsch: The game layer on top of the world

Link: Rap lyrics mapped

(kottke)

Link: Google Maps without the map

(kottke)

Link: Homoerotic scenes in movies

The Misconception: You are one person, and your happiness is based on being content with your life.

The Truth: You are multiple selves, and happiness is based on satisfying all of them.

Link: The Notorious “Rooftop Quarry”