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Tag Archives: cmcl

Night of the Living Tech (see also Bernard Gotfryd)

Strip away the headline hyperbole of the “death of” predictions, they note, and what remains is mainly commentary on the impact of the accelerated pace of change and accumulated innovations in the Internet-era media and communications environment. A result has been a proliferation of digital media forms and fast-shifting patterns of media consumption.

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Link: Francois Truffaut’s last interview

(via kottke)

François Truffaut was a french film theorist, critic, and filmmaker. He’s probably one of the most well know of the former categories. If you’re not familiar with his work, but interested in film, one place to start is with Truffaut’s early writings which were later typified as “Auteur Theory”.

Link: In Remembrance of Susan Sontag

William Drenttel with Design Observer

Great Post by Kottke:

Peggy Nelson argues that everyone being on their mobile phones all the time — even while at a dinner for two — isn’t rude, it signals a shift from our society’s emphasis on the individual to the networked “flow”.

We’ve moved from the etiquette of the individual to the etiquette of the flow.

This is not mob rule, nor is it the fearsome hive mind, the sound of six billion vuvuzelas buzzing. This is not individuals giving up their autonomy or their rational agency. This is individuals choosing to be in touch with each other constantly, exchanging stories and striving for greater connection. The network does not replace the individual, but augments it. We have become individuals-plus-networks, and our ideas immediately have somewhere to go. As a result we’re always having all of our conversations now, flexible geometries of nodes and strands, with links and laughing and gossip and facts flying back and forth. But the real message is movement.

But au contrairemon frere.

My new standard of cool: when I’m hanging out with you, I never see your phone ever ever ever.

If we’re hanging out and you pull out your iPhone to water your Farmville crops, we can no longer be friends. It’s not me, it’s you.

http://www.movingimagesource.us/flash/mediaplayer.swf?id=118/879

Razzle Dazzle is a six-part video essay that looks at how movies have examined the many facets of fame (heroism, infamy, and everything in between) and how they have shaped the audience’s perception of what fame offers.