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Category Archives: quote

The future is going to happen no matter what we do. The future will feel even faster than it does now.

Douglas Coupland’s guide to the next ten years.

There’s something comforting about this story: even Nobel-winning economists procrastinate! Many of us go through life with an array of undone tasks, large and small, nibbling at our conscience. But Akerlof saw the experience, for all its familiarity, as mysterious. He genuinely intended to send the box to his friend, yet, as he wrote, in a paper called “Procrastination and Obedience” (1991), “each morning for over eight months I woke up and decided that the next morning would be the day to send the Stiglitz box.” He was always about to send the box, but the moment to act never arrived. Akerlof, who became one of the central figures in behavioral economics, came to the realization that procrastination might be more than just a bad habit. He argued that it revealed something important about the limits of rational thinking and that it could teach useful lessons about phenomena as diverse as substance abuse and savings habits. Since his essay was published, the study of procrastination has become a significant field in academia, with philosophers, psychologists, and economists all weighing in.

Later: What does procrastination tell us about ourselves? in The New Yorker via Nellie

Stewart-Colbertism scorns extremism of all types, but especially conservative extremism, and most especially conservative extremism driven by ignorance or religious fundamentalism. It is mildly critical of liberalism, but mainly for failing to combat conservative bombast more effectively. It endorses, implicitly, whatever liberal consensus has managed to survive these past 30 years, but isn’t terribly interested in the details. All this works well as humor, but as a sentiment shouted through a bullhorn to thousands stretched between the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument, it will translate into, well, judging other people for what they don’t know.

Timothy Noah for Slate in Stay Home! The case against the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear.

Interesting. Sure these shows can in some ways be pretentious, but somehow the effort of doing anything physical, like a rally/march, seems to cross a boundary that Stewart and Colbert have never crossed before. It seems to cross a boundary into something unpretentious—or at least, un-elite—because it involves not being out of sight. The people at the rally will be on camera—for once, the people who watch at home will be in their own eyes. Will it be a mirror? I don’t know, but I disagree Noah, simply because I’ve never heard of anything quite like this happening and I’m very interested to see it…on TV.

What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.

Andy Warhol

Such a classic quote, I’ve hear it so many times. A friend of mine almost got a tattoo of a coke bottle essentially because of this logic (but he hasn’t, as far as I know). Once again, via kottke.

The film has been criticized for poorly portraying women, which is true, but this misses how the film poorly portrays everyone. Nearly every character is an embarrassment in some significant way, and the movie is largely criticizing the shallowness of elites (Harvard, Silicon valley, lawyers, VCs, the upper class, etc.). The movie is a critique of the kinds of people who would choose to profit from changing the world based on the model of “facebooks” (e.g. yearbooks), relationship status and friending people. The point is: it’s a 19 or 20 year old view of the universe, for better and, as the movie emphasizes, for worse. It’s notable Zuckerberg’s fiancé, with whom he was dating the entire duration of the time shown in the film, isn’t mentioned much less seen. But otherwise it’s hard to find particular bias: I doubt anyone feels great about how they are portrayed in this movie.

Scott Berkun

They also went and made a Phantom 3D camera for us. There wasn’t one before, so they went and made us one, so we could film shooting a dildo bazooka with it. We were using the world’s most expensive camera to shoot the world’s dumbest stuff. It was great.

Johnny Knoxville in an Interview with Twitch

Malcolm Gladwell’s take on social media is like a nun’s likely review of the Kama Sutra — self-righteous and misguided by virtue of voluntary self-exclusion from the subject.

Maria Popova for Design Observer in Malcolm Gladwell Is #Wrong

This was written in response to the New Yorker article The Revolution Will Not be Tweeted. I love the phrase “voluntary self-exclusion.”

In ‘Melancholia’ I start with the end. Because what is interesting is not what happens but how it happens! So we begin by seeing the world being crushed, then we can tell the story afterwards.

Lars Von Trier regarding his new scifi thriller Melancholia

2001 would give a little insight into my metaphysical interests… I’d be very surprised if the universe wasn’t full of an intelligence of an order that to us would seem God-like. I find it very exciting to have a semi-logical belief that there’s a great deal to the universe we don’t understand, and that there is an intelligence of an incredible magnitude outside the Earth. It’s something I’ve become more and more interested in. I find it a very exciting and satisfying hope.

Stanley Kubrick (via itsfullofstars)

I’m looking at your face and I just want to smash it. I want to smash it with a sledge hammer and squeeze it, it’s so pretty.

Barry from Punch-Drunk Love